Tea Review: Lipton Bright Asian Fusion

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And again I am coming back to you with a tea review. It’s been a while… In the meantime, I have collected a couple of teas to try and to share my experience, and am above eager to start with a good old green Lipton.

This time, it is a Bright Asian Fusion blend of “light white, smooth green with notes of lychee”. Lipton lures us into tasting with an exclamation “Turn over a new leaf”! Nice and positive approach, a promise of new beginnings. The box itself is cheery in the shades of green and yellow and, as typical for the brand, decorated with abstract designs.

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I’ve written it in my earlier posts, but as readership has significantly grown since, I will repeat myself. The pyramidal shape of teabags is actually patented by Lipton. The company claims that the Pyramid bag enables tea leaves to “swirl and swirl for a delightful treat moment“. Apparently, this was Lipton‘s response to Harney and Sons tea bags design back in 2006. Unilever (the “umbrella” of Lipton) came with the pyramidal shaped bag when they started noticing a trend: “every consumer is becoming gourmand“. The Pyramid bag was proven to be the best option how to offer higher quality tea – long leaves instead of sifted and graded leaves, which used to be the case earlier.

The packaging includes 20 pyramidal tea bags, as usual.

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Ingredients: Green tea, white tea (11%), aroma.

Preparation: as with any other green tea, I would recommend brewing in water of 80-90 degrees Celsius. I would rather stay at the low end this range, as the blend includes white tea, which is recommended to be served at a slightly lower temperature.

Smell: very subtle, barely there, scent of tea leaves with a slightly fruity note (lychee, perhaps, but definitely not distinctively recognisable). Aroma doesn’t linger for too long, it’s rather light, everyday inoffensive tea.

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Flavour: that’s where the lychee sparkles – the fruitiness is distinct and definitely present, but not overpowering. As said above, this tea is a really light and inoffensive every-day option. Lipton’s marketing gurus proudly note that its”balanced taste” would definitely attract even the green tea beginners. Depending on the longevity of the steep/brew, the tea develops a slight bitterness, hence I’d recommend to remove the tea bag after approximately 3-5 minutes.

Energy level: white tea slightly “relaxes” the intensity of the green tea; nonetheless, this tea is amazing for early mornings or sleepy afternoons. It can guarantee a 1-2 hour energy boost.

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Lipton Bright Asian Fusion is recommended to everyone who is just starting with green tea. Thanks to the white tea note that smoothens the unapologetically green taste, it works as an every day companion for morning or afternoon tea ceremonies. Due to the amount of caffeine, I wouldn’t recommend it for evening drinking. All in all, this tea is approachable and goes well with any dessert, due to the lack of sweetness in the flavour.

Have you already tried white tea? What’s your take on it? Would you go for white or green tea on the daily basis? Let me know!

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My Caffeine-Free Tea Collection + How I Store My Tea

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If you’ve been following my blog for a while, you might already know that I am a huge fan of black and green tea blends, which pretty much sum up my daily consumption. In the last blogpost I went above and beyond and introduced my favourite herbal infusion that I like to diversify my tea drinking routine with from time to time.

Here, I’d like to present my current caffeine-free tea selection that I keep in my drawers for days when I don’t feel like caffeine (hardly ever 🙂 ).

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First things first, I got rid of the bulky paper packaging and stored the selection in the aluminium tin (purchased at Tchibo). It helps to keep the teas I usually don’t go for on my mind and all in one place. The tin itself has 6 compartments for approximately 15 tea bags each, hence it makes for handy storage for a variety.

The first tea to be found in my aluminium box is the Spring tea (Frühlings Tee) from Alnatura. Since I dedicated my last blogpost to it, I won’t get much into detail here. Maybe it’s worth mentioning that currently it is one of my favourite herbal infusions, and possibly the best one for when the days get warmer.

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Next stop, is a tea from Korres, a Greek brand of organic cosmetics. Yes, surprisingly enough, they also store teas. This tea technically contains caffeine, but due to the ingredients (Greek Red Saffron, Lemon and Spearmint) it has found its way into my selection. The flavour is quite specific, I won’t deny this, and it is surely not a tea I would go for on a daily basis, but Red Saffron and Spearmint definitely add something “extra” to the plain black tea. Korres teas are quite pricey, but you have to take into consideration the fact they are organic and that the majority of ingredients are rather unique.

Tea from the DM’s (drugstore) homebrand Das Gesunde Plus is, on the contrary, the cheap alternative to the organic teas family. One of my all time favourites is their Rooibos Vanilla Orange tea, that I find myself reaching for on a regular basis. I like my Rooibos with Vanilla, it is not a surprise, but this one has a tiny hint of sourness due to the Orange flavour. However unusual the combination might sound, in the end it makes a tasty and refreshing, aromatic blend.

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Another Rooibos of the collection is Pickwick’s Rooibos Vanilla tea. This one comes in “fancy” fabric tea bags, which is not too typical for me to keep in my collection box (I indeed, prefer when the tea is covered with paper for this kind of storage), but I go through it quite quickly and I assume that soon enough I’ll be able to replace it with a more “storage-friendly” tea. As noted above, Rooibos Vanilla tends to be my all-time favourite variation of Rooibos, and I am positive that one way or another, it will always be a part of my collection.

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King’s Crown, the affordable tea brand that is available in another drugstore – Rossmann – is always an attractive option considering their tea variations. I wrote a blogpost about its Green Tea that became the part of my daily routine, but its white tea is kept in my storage for when I feel like something special. This Pomegranate White Tea combines two of my favourite things: the pomegranate flavour with the freshness and lightness of white tea, which is always a good option when you feel like “real” tea, but not caffeine.

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Red tea cannot be missing from the caffeine-free tea collection: and this time a Rosehip tea from Teekanne took over this role. For the moments when I feel a little low on vitamins and am craving something sour. This tea is also exquisite when served cool – very nice refreshing feeling, especially on hot summer days.

The “loner” of my collection is a Lemon Sky from Ronnefeldt that was purchased separately, out of curiosity. Obviously, I haven’t tried it yet, but the combination of Flavoured Fruit Infusion with Lemon Flavour sounds exciting enough for me to give it a go soon.

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What are your favourite caffeine-free teas? Do you go for herbal ones or rather fruit infusions? Is there a special way you like to store your tea? Let me know!

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