My Caffeine-Free Tea Collection + How I Store My Tea

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If you’ve been following my blog for a while, you might already know that I am a huge fan of black and green tea blends, which pretty much sum up my daily consumption. In the last blogpost I went above and beyond and introduced my favourite herbal infusion that I like to diversify my tea drinking routine with from time to time.

Here, I’d like to present my current caffeine-free tea selection that I keep in my drawers for days when I don’t feel like caffeine (hardly ever 🙂 ).

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First things first, I got rid of the bulky paper packaging and stored the selection in the aluminium tin (purchased at Tchibo). It helps to keep the teas I usually don’t go for on my mind and all in one place. The tin itself has 6 compartments for approximately 15 tea bags each, hence it makes for handy storage for a variety.

The first tea to be found in my aluminium box is the Spring tea (FrĂĽhlings Tee) from Alnatura. Since I dedicated my last blogpost to it, I won’t get much into detail here. Maybe it’s worth mentioning that currently it is one of my favourite herbal infusions, and possibly the best one for when the days get warmer.

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Next stop, is a tea from Korres, a Greek brand of organic cosmetics. Yes, surprisingly enough, they also store teas. This tea technically contains caffeine, but due to the ingredients (Greek Red Saffron, Lemon and Spearmint) it has found its way into my selection. The flavour is quite specific, I won’t deny this, and it is surely not a tea I would go for on a daily basis, but Red Saffron and Spearmint definitely add something “extra” to the plain black tea. Korres teas are quite pricey, but you have to take into consideration the fact they are organic and that the majority of ingredients are rather unique.

Tea from the DM’s (drugstore) homebrand Das Gesunde Plus is, on the contrary, the cheap alternative to the organic teas family. One of my all time favourites is their Rooibos Vanilla Orange tea, that I find myself reaching for on a regular basis. I like my Rooibos with Vanilla, it is not a surprise, but this one has a tiny hint of sourness due to the Orange flavour. However unusual the combination might sound, in the end it makes a tasty and refreshing, aromatic blend.

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Another Rooibos of the collection is Pickwick’s Rooibos Vanilla tea. This one comes in “fancy” fabric tea bags, which is not too typical for me to keep in my collection box (I indeed, prefer when the tea is covered with paper for this kind of storage), but I go through it quite quickly and I assume that soon enough I’ll be able to replace it with a more “storage-friendly” tea. As noted above, Rooibos Vanilla tends to be my all-time favourite variation of Rooibos, and I am positive that one way or another, it will always be a part of my collection.

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King’s Crown, the affordable tea brand that is available in another drugstore – Rossmann – is always an attractive option considering their tea variations. I wrote a blogpost about its Green Tea that became the part of my daily routine, but its white tea is kept in my storage for when I feel like something special. This Pomegranate White Tea combines two of my favourite things: the pomegranate flavour with the freshness and lightness of white tea, which is always a good option when you feel like “real” tea, but not caffeine.

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Red tea cannot be missing from the caffeine-free tea collection: and this time a Rosehip tea from Teekanne took over this role. For the moments when I feel a little low on vitamins and am craving something sour. This tea is also exquisite when served cool – very nice refreshing feeling, especially on hot summer days.

The “loner” of my collection is a Lemon Sky from Ronnefeldt that was purchased separately, out of curiosity. Obviously, I haven’t tried it yet, but the combination of Flavoured Fruit Infusion with Lemon Flavour sounds exciting enough for me to give it a go soon.

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What are your favourite caffeine-free teas? Do you go for herbal ones or rather fruit infusions? Is there a special way you like to store your tea? Let me know!

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Tea Review: King’s Crown Vanilla Green Tea

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This time I’m afraid I won’t be 100% objective, because I’m up to reviewing one of my all time favourite teas. It’s a very affordable blend of green tea and vanilla under the German brand King’s Crown.

First disclaimer: this tea might not be easy to get everywhere. As far as I know it is distributed via the chain of the drugstores Rossmann, hence it will only be available in the countries where Rossmann exists as an established brand. Correct me if I am wrong.

Second disclaimer: just like in my previous reviews, we are dealing with the packaged tea of a cheaper price range, hence it will only makes sense to not expect unique, high-quality blends of tea leaves or intense flavour. Nonetheless, I consider this tea one of the best as your “morning-in-a-hurry” choice.

Universality is what I especially like about this tea. Its inoffensive, light, barely there vanilla taste blends so well with the green tea flavour. I guess you still need to be a vanilla fan, at least to some extent, to fully appreciate the miracle of this tea.

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It comes in a packaging of 25 flat tea bags, packed in a separate paper envelope (1,75g each).

Ingredients: Green tea, Vanilla aroma, Vanilla.

Scent: light, subtle aroma of vanilla. Aroma of green tea is not especially prominent though.

Taste: again, as stated above, the taste is an inoffensive, light vanilla blend with extremely soft notes of green tea. It’s very easy to drink, especially for somebody who is just getting into understanding and liking green tea. I reckon that the tea concentration is not very high in each teabag, which makes it a lighter alternative to more “heavy duty” green teas. This makes drinking King’s Choice Vanilla Green tea in the afternoon-early evening possible, without risking a “caffeine stroke”. 🙂

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Serving: leave boiling water to cool down for 5-10 minutes (if your kettle offers a temperature option, heat up to 80 degrees Celsius), then pour it over a tea bag. Let it steep for 3-4 minutes. The steeping time is longer than the usual 2-3 minutes, also because of the green tea concentration I am discussing above.

Energy level: 2 stars out of 5. Again, due to the very light tea concentration, this won’t be your typical “wake me up, NOW” green tea.

All in all, this tea means pure happiness for me. As a huge vanilla fan, I learned to appreciate this light, subtle flavour in a cup of tea. In my opinion, anyone who came with an idea of vanilla green tea might have been a genius. This combination strikes me as very balanced, delicious and simple at the same time, and could only be beaten by the unbeatable classics – green tea + lemon. I noticed that this combination is quite popular in Germany: there are plenty of German mainstream tea brands that offer green tea with vanilla in there assortment, it is almost as popular and easy to find as green tea with lemon combination.

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If you are a fan of flavoured tea like me, and love experimenting with new aromas and blends, you are on the right way here. I recommend pairing the tender flavour of vanilla with the Ferrero Rocher’s Ferrero Kuesschen white chocolates with a hazelnut hidden inside.

Have you tried vanilla-flavoured green tea? How do you feel about vanilla flavours in your drinks (I, for instance, love Vanilla Coke)? If there’s a German person reading this blog, do you often reach for Green tea with vanilla?

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